December 10, 2012
avoid-math

College Math Classes: Are You Avoiding Them?

Are you saving your math class (or classes!) for the very end? Are you planning to take math your last semester before you graduate? If you are, I’m guessing you might not enjoy math and might even be a little intimidated by it. Maybe it has been a long time since you used fractions or perhaps you had a bad experience with a math teacher in middle school. Whatever the reason, stop waiting—we can help you! Getting started on math early dramatically improves your chances of graduating.

We Won’t Let Math Stand in Your Way

We don’t want math to stand between you and your dreams, so we’re here to help. At FRCC, we have a range of basic math classes, expert tutors, and faculty-run math support labs. Our math teachers know just how to help you and are often experts at supporting students who struggle or experience math anxiety.

You Have What It Takes!

Believe it or not, part of conquering math is something called self-efficacy—the belief that you have what it takes to be successful. You may not understand quadratic equations yet, but you can start to change your attitude toward those sometimes frustrating numbers and letters! How do you do that? Start by taking the course you are ready for. Talk to the teacher the first day to start a relationship. Commit to studying regularly. Find a friend to help you study. With a plan, and a commitment to your own success, you can change your belief. Trust me. It makes a difference.

Many Subjects Require a Solid Understanding of Math Concepts

Math also helps you think in a clear, rational way that can help develop important critical thinking skills. Taking math now is a good idea for so many reasons. The next time you meet with your advisor, plan on talking about how to fit math into your educational plans. You’ll be glad you did.

 

About the author:

Andy Dorsey is the President of Front Range Community College. He joined FRCC in 1993, teaching psychology and economics and earning Master Teacher honors in 1999. Before becoming an educator, he worked as a project manager in two businesses, non-profit manager, and legislative director for a Congressman.

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