Front Range Community College Blog

Front Range Community College: A Boon for Colorado, Adams County

Give to the FRCC Foundation

I know how tough it is to pay for a college education. While studying at Colorado State University, I worked construction during the summers and did work-study throughout the school year. I was able to attend the University of Denver Sturm College of Law because I was a full-time employee for a global management consulting company. And even with working full time, I still had additional student loans from law school.

I also know that education changes life trajectories.

That is why I just contributed to the Front Range Community College Foundation, which provides scholarships to students who would have to forego college without this financial help.

Education Boosts Our Economy

By 2020, 65 percent of all jobs in Colorado will require post-secondary education and training. FRCC is uniquely prepared to help Colorado residents meet that challenge. FRCC is a pathway to both four-year universities and marketable skills through two-year degrees and short-term, career-focused certificates.

FRCC’s leadership team tracks the state’s changing economy and employment opportunities and develops programs to meet community needs. And Colorado businesses and manufacturers seek out FRCC to devise unique programs or expand current programs that provide students with skills that contribute to local companies’ efficiency, productivity, and profitability.

More than 90 percent of FRCC graduates are employed in Colorado. They bring their knowledge and training to area employers and their buying power to the local economy, contributing more than $591 million to our economy annually.

FRCC provides its students the skills they need to get a job and have economic success, and that is a terrific boon for our local and state economy.

FRCC’s statistics are impressive. Its three campuses make it the largest community college in Colorado. FRCC and CSU were recognized as one of the top six “high-performing community colleges and universities” by the Aspen Institute. FRCC is also the No. 1 transfer institution to CSU, the University of Colorado-Boulder, University of Northern Colorado, Regis University, Colorado Mesa University, Western State Colorado University, and CSU Global. More than 70 percent of FRCC scholarship recipients transfer, and they are just as successful—both in GPA and time to graduation—as students who begin their educations at these four-year schools.

Education Is a Passport to Success

I live in this community, so I know firsthand that FRCC scholarship applicants are working moms, dads, and single parents. They are veterans. Many are the first in their family to earn a college degree. Most are in the workforce, balancing jobs, family, and their education. A staggering 67 percent have an annual household income of less than $20,000.

I am so proud that FRCC has a campus in Adams County. I am also proud to help a local student get an education. Scholarships are transformative. And success for these young people means success for our local businesses and companies. That’s a win-win, a great bang for my buck, and a boon for Adams County.

Colorado Gives Day this year was another great success. The day aims at celebrating and increasing philanthropy. Even though the day has come and gone, any day is a great day to contribute to the FRCC Foundation or any number of other terrific, caring organizations that deserve your support and generosity.

Avatar for Steve O

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Steve O'Dorisio is one of five elected individuals on the Adams County Board of County Commissioners. Previously, he was the deputy district attorney for the 17th Judicial District of Colorado and a member of the Adams County Planning Commission.