August 20, 2012
Get-involved

Ways to get Involved at College

Most community college students are focused on their studies, work, and family, but college is also a time to make new friends, explore extracurricular interests, and try on leadership roles. In addition to all the learning you do in the classroom—whether online or face-to-face—you can also learn by getting involved on campus! College offers students a wide range of activities and programs to get involved.

Lead

Consider running for a position in Student Government or throw your hat in the ring for a leadership position in one of the dozens of student clubs.

Join

Not ready for a leadership role? Join one of the many student clubs. Here at FRCC, w e have everything from the Phi Theta Kappa honor society to clubs for future sign language interpreters, LGBT students, anime fans, and Bible study groups. Don’t see something you like? Find some like-minded students and start a club of your own. Student Life can point you in the right direction.

Create

Start a study group. Many students learn best when studying with others, challenging each other’s knowledge, forcing each other to explain complex subjects and just supporting each other in learning. Plus, study groups can be fun. Take a chance and invite others to a study group.

Support

The next time you hear about an exhibit in a campus art gallery or performance by student musicians or actors, make plans to go! Bring your family and friends and get everyone involved on campus. You can also buy handmade pottery, cupcakes, or a plant start at club fundraising sales.

Give

You can get involved off campus by participating in service learning opportunities. Some of these are offered through specific classes, but keep your eyes open for other ways to learn by serving as well.

 

How are you getting involved on campus this semester? Has someone been particularly good at helping you make connections?

 

About the author:

Andy Dorsey is the President of Front Range Community College. He joined FRCC in 1993, teaching psychology and economics and earning Master Teacher honors in 1999. Before becoming an educator, he worked as a project manager in two businesses, non-profit manager, and legislative director for a Congressman.